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Toxic Relationships How to Escape Toxic Relationships


A good relationship can elevate your life in ways that you never thought were possible. A bad one can leave you heartbroken, depressed, and listless. Toxic relationships are more common than you might think, and their effects can often be crippling.


Toxic and unhealthy relationships are often baffling to people on the outside. Surely, if someone makes you miserable or is physically or emotionally abusive, the obvious decision is to leave them—right? The reality is often more complicated due to many factors, including finances, children, and emotions. To leave a toxic relationship, you should:

  1. Build your social support

  2. Explore ways to become more independent

  3. Lean on family, friends, and others as you are leaving

  4. Get help from professionals, including a therapist, attorney, or law enforcement

  5. Cutt off contact with the other person

  6. Care for yourself as you transition out of the toxic relationship

What Is a Toxic Relationship?

A toxic relationship is one that is  harmful. While some signs of a toxic relationship are more obvious—like physical abuse, repeated infidelity, and inappropriate sexual behaviour—others can be harder to detect. It may involve disrespectful, dishonest, or controlling behaviour. For example, your partner cuts you down frequently. As a result, your mental health may begin to suffer.


Abuse and Domestic Violence

While a relationship does not have to involve abuse for it to be considered toxic, all abusive relationships are toxic. Abuse can manifest in different ways, including emotional, verbal, economic, sexual, and physical.


Signs of an abusive relationship can appear in physical or sexual violence, name-calling, humiliation, or threats. These types of relationships are typically characterized by possessive and controlling behaviours. If you're experiencing any type of abuse, know that you don't deserve to live that way and reach out for support immediately.

Hypnotherapy is a really effective way of kickstarting the healing process. Treatment may also involve the use of the integration of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) to help  evaluate thoughts and feelings related to trauma and replace negative thinking with more realistic thoughts

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